And this isn't revenue raising?

THE tactics employed by operators of mobile speed cameras in Wagga at the weekend has left some motorists convinced their presence isn't about road safety but raising revenue.

On at least two occasions, signs warning motorists of the presence of the mobile speed camera were obscured by parked vehicles which has prompted member for Wagga Daryl Maguire to raise the issue with Roads Minister Duncan Gay.

The Roads and Maritime Service (RMS) is conducting an urgent investigation into the matter.

Under the NSW Speed Camera Strategy released in June last year, mobile speed camera signs and vehicle markings were enhanced and the number of warning signs doubled to make enforcement more visible to motorists.

But close inspection and documentation by a number of Wagga motorists at the weekend has highlighted the fact the warning signs were placed in locations not readily visible by approaching motorists.

“There are clear key protocols for the placement of the signs put into place after we came into government,” Mr Maguire said. 

“I have been in touch with the minister to raise the issue and if there are breaches to have occurred the people putting the signs out will be set straight.

“I’m well aware it was an issue and motorists want to be given a fair warning and for the signs to be visible.”

Just after 6pm last night, the RMS was unable to provide answers about the sign placements and were committed to providing a response today. 

A spokeswoman was able to confirm the operations of the camera are contracted to Redflex, which only received an agreed contract rate per hour of enforcement, not a commission for the number of speeding incidents detected, debunking concerns by motorists operators were hiding signs for their own benefit. 

Rod Donkin is one of the Wagga residents who at the weekend took evidence of the speed camera vehicle set up on Tarcutta Street after reading the concerns of former head of Wagga police Kevin Wales.

He agreed with the need for the cameras, but said it was questionable as to why the signs were hidden.

“Fair enough if you speed and you get caught, but they need to be fair about it,” Mr Donkin said. 

“I am sure that any person on the road will say they don’t like it.” 

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