What’s on at the gallery, October 15, 2016

STRIKING: Mikkali Rowe, Cotton Road 2016, digital photograph, features in the Photography Graduation Exhibition from Charles Sturt University students.

STRIKING: Mikkali Rowe, Cotton Road 2016, digital photograph, features in the Photography Graduation Exhibition from Charles Sturt University students.

NEXT weekend, the popular Photography Graduation Exhibition by students from Charles Sturt University returns for its ninth year.

‘bespoken’ showcases the next wave of exciting and talented young photographers with an eclectic array of creative talent and ideas.

‘bespoken: CSU BCAD Photography’ will be officially launched next Saturday, October 22 in the Links Gallery, at 6pm.

One of the highlights of Wagga’s arts calendar, this annual event is a great opportunity to meet the future stars of Australian photography.

Joanna Bone: In Depth

LAST CHANCE: Joanna Bones' exhibition In Depth closes Sunday, October 16. Picture: Jacob Raupach

LAST CHANCE: Joanna Bones' exhibition In Depth closes Sunday, October 16. Picture: Jacob Raupach

THIS weekend is your last chance to catch a glimpse of the work of one of Australia’s most acclaimed glass artists, Joanna Bone, whose exhibition In Depth closes Sunday.

This stunning collection is inspired by the colours, textures and form of Queensland’s marine environment.

The translucency, colour, and optical characteristics of glass are reminiscent of the ocean layers and draw the viewer’s eye, inviting intense visual exploration of the depths and intensity of the pieces.

Joanna Bone is one of Queensland’s foremost glass artists.

Her work is internationally recognised and is held in prominent collections including Wagga Wagga Art Gallery’s National Art Glass Collection and the Film Museum of Tehran, as well as numerous private collections around the world.

Joanna is the only Queensland-based artist to have won the prestigious Ranamok Glass Prize for Australian and New Zealand artists.

Joanna’s unique style of working, developed over the past decade, involves engraving the surface of simple glass forms that have been created hot from pre-formed multi-layered and multi-coloured glass cane.

Describing the work in In Depth, Joanna Bone said; “Our affinity with nature, ‘its beauty’, can be explained by how nature’s patterns are modelled mathematically through formulas of symmetry. The regularities in natural patterns are what the order seeking human eye comprehends as ‘beauty’.”

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