What’s on at the theatre, September 17, 2016

CLASSIC: Giselle's story follows an innocent village girl transformed into a tender spirit after dying of a broken heart.

CLASSIC: Giselle's story follows an innocent village girl transformed into a tender spirit after dying of a broken heart.

EVERY time I catch a glimpse of the promotional images for Giselle I feel a very strong urge to make myself a beautiful tutu. Then as I walk through my day everything will dissolve into romance and fairy-tales.

Love conquers all in the ultimate romantic ballet. Experience one of the world’s most loved ballets live on stage when The Australian Ballet’s Regional Tour presents Giselle. The show stars artists from The Australian Ballet and graduating students from The Australian Ballet School, this specially staged production will sweep audiences away.

Since its premiere in 1841, Giselle has captured the imagination and torn at the heart. The transcendent love story follows an innocent village girl transformed into a tender spirit after dying of a broken heart. With its hauntingly beautiful ensemble of white tutus, its classical technique and its heartbreaking romance, Giselle is a must-see ballet that’s perfect for the whole family.

Wagga is one of the five regional NSW locations that the Australian Ballet is touring to in October. The Civic Theatre will host three performances of Giselle – two have been sold out for some time but there is good availability at the recently added matinee on Saturday, October 15 at 1.30pm. Tickets can be purchased online at www.civictheatre.com.au or from the Box Office on 6926 9688.

The Australian Ballet website is a beautiful place to visit (www.australian com.au). 

CLASS: The Australian Ballet will host a workshop on Friday, October 14 from 4.30pm in Wagga.

CLASS: The Australian Ballet will host a workshop on Friday, October 14 from 4.30pm in Wagga.

As well as amazing images you can learn about the protocol of visiting a theatre to see a performance, the history of this ancient craft and there are also some really cool frequently asked questions, including “how long does it take to make a tutu?”  

However, the answer given on the website has made me reassess my fantasy tutu problem solving approach to life: A classical tutu requires the unique skills of cutters and costumiers, who work in close consultation to produce a costume. It can take up to two weeks of solid work to produce a single tutu.

I found out some other interesting information too, including when The Australian Ballet tours internationally, the dancers must travel on two planes, so that the precious artists of the company are not all in the sky at the one time.

I encourage you to have a look at this well-crafted information source, I also learnt that the stage managers sometimes mop the specially sprung Tarkett floors on our stages with Coca Cola or a sugar-water solution to make them sticky so that the dancers’ shoes will grip the floor, reducing the danger of slips.

And did you know that formaldehyde was used for many years to give tutus their characteristic stiffness. Since it was phased out, the costume department are in constant battle against “tutu droop” as they test less toxic solvents.

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WHILE in town the Ballet Mistress of the Australian Ballet, Eve Lawson, will teach a special class on stage.

This class will give you the chance to work to perfect your skills and learn new techniques (which our dancers use themselves) to improve your alignment and movement. 

This class is suitable for ages 13 to 18 with minimum grade six ballet experience. 

The workshop will be on Friday, October 14 from 4.30pm, runs for 75 minutes and will cost $27 to participate. 

Workshop places are limited and can be booked on the Australian Ballet website.

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