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New partnership to change how solar panels are recycledAdvertising Feature

Solar Professionals are excited to be partnering with Kurrajong Recycling to operate what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind in Australia. Pictures supplied
Solar Professionals are excited to be partnering with Kurrajong Recycling to operate what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind in Australia. Pictures supplied

A new and exciting partnership initiative is under way at Kurrajong Recycling which aims to change the way solar panels are disposed of and recycled in Australia.

Solar Renew is a commercial partnership between Kurrajong and solar providers The Solar Professionals, to recycle Solar PV panels at Kurrajong's Wagga Wagga recycling site.

The Solar Professionals, in partnership with a collective known as Circular Solar Solutions Pty Ltd (which is a collaboration between Deakin University, APEX Greenhouses, Anderson Services, and cross industry consultants, and is a NSW EPA-funded project), have developed a semi-automated solar PV panel recycling plant, which it is piloting with Kurrajong Recycling.

The system works by delaminating the panels into the main components of glass, aluminium, copper, silicon, silver, and a polymer, with the process enabling each of the separated materials to be returned to, or sold into, various commodity markets.

Glass from the panels are earmarked for the likes of agricultural and domestic glasshouses, and the system is also being investigated by the USA National Research Energy Lab as it trials the manufacturing of new solar panels.

The pilot plant was commissioned at Kurrajong's recycling site between April and July this year, and technicians are currently being trained in the use of the equipment, opening up several employment opportunities as a result.

Kurrajong chief executive Ray Carroll said the pilot was a hugely exciting initiative that Kurrajong was thrilled to be part of.

Solar Professionals managing director Daniel Kimber said he was excited to be partnering with Kurrajong to operate what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind automated recycling plant in Australia that could separate the panel into its raw materials.

"We are continually looking for ways to build what we can offer our clients and customers," Daniel said.

"So this initiative was a great way to investigate something that will help create employment, income, and environmental benefits across the board".

New partnership to change how solar panels are recycled
New partnership to change how solar panels are recycled