Top Wagga steers sell for a cause | Video

CHARITABLE ACT: Andrew Bell and Peter Thomas of Wagga RSL and Stephen Reynolds who is president of Willans Hill School P&C are pictured with the Hereford charity steer and John Rodd of Wagga. Picture: Nikki Reynolds
CHARITABLE ACT: Andrew Bell and Peter Thomas of Wagga RSL and Stephen Reynolds who is president of Willans Hill School P&C are pictured with the Hereford charity steer and John Rodd of Wagga. Picture: Nikki Reynolds

EVERY now and then prices go so high at the Wagga Livestock Marketing Centre that there is a collective clap and cheer from buyers and vendors who are sitting ringside. 

And one occasion which is guaranteed to send prices soaring through the roof is when the popular RSL charity steers go under the hammer.

Cattle industry stalwart John Rodd of Wagga is known for his skill in preparing beef animals for the show ring.

He is also known for his fondness of working with the Wagga RSL charity steers each year. In fact, he has prepared so many that he has almost lost count.

On November 6 at 10am, during the cattle sale at Wagga, a Murray Grey and a Hereford steer will be sold to raise funds for the Willans Hill School in Wagga. 

Mr Rodd said the Poll Hereford, named Merlin was 15-months and currently weighed about 380 kilograms but would obviously tip the scales at more than that on sale day.

Ben is the Murray Grey steer, also aged 15-months, with a current weight of 430 kilograms. 

Part of the preparation phase of the two steers meant they were available for school students to assess during the Wagga Show.

Industry experts explained the carcase attributes of beef animals. 

It was also an opportunity for members of the RSL to discuss the project and catch up with Willans Hill School P&C president Stephen Reynolds. 

Wagga RSL general manager Andrew Bell said former club president John Keys, who was the instigator behind the project a number of years ago, would be attending the upcoming auction. 

Mr Bell also commended the work of Mr Rodd and his daughters Nicole and Kimberley and how they prepare the steers. 

“The Rodd family has given up their own time to make sure the steers were well looked after,” he said. 

It is estimated the steers could make $10,000 each with Aristocrat Gaming set to take the lead in the bidding. 

Mr Bell said Aristocrat had supported the initiative in previous years.