Gundagai trainer Andrew Sheahan to give Golan Power a dry-track test

WINNING COMBINATION: Golan Power cools off as Gundagai trainer Andrew Sheahan talks with jockey Nyssa Burrells after a win in August. Picture: Gemma Cummins

WINNING COMBINATION: Golan Power cools off as Gundagai trainer Andrew Sheahan talks with jockey Nyssa Burrells after a win in August. Picture: Gemma Cummins

GUNDAGAI trainer Andrew Sheahan is keen to see if his bold front-runner Golan Power is much more than a mudlark in Saturday’s League of Their Own Mile.

Golan Power will look to return to winning form when he contests the William Farrer Hotel League of Their Own Mile (1600m) at Murrumbidgee Turf Club.

The seven-year-old has been a top purchase for Sheahan and connections as he has relished the wet conditions over the Southern District winter.

With the Wagga track drying at a rapid rate ahead of Saturday’s Men of League race day, Sheahan is slightly concerned about the prospect of a dry track for Golan Power.

“I can’t fault him at the minute but the drier track does worry me,” Sheahan said.

“He doesn’t cope with firmer surfaces.”

How Golan Power came to be at Gundagai is quite the journey.

Bred in New Zealand, Golan Power started his racing career in Hong Kong.

He then went back to New Zealand, where he ran a close-up fourth behind talented mare Lady Le Fay.

After breaking his maiden over 2000m in New Zealand, he came to Australia with John Sargent at Randwick and won the one race at Goulburn.

He has been at Gundagai now for ‘six to eight months’ and has thrived.

“He’s been around a bit but he’s a beautiful horse to train,” Sheahan said.

“We don’t have to do too much with him between races, once he’s fit.

“If all horses were like him, everyone would be taking their trainer’s licence out.”

Golan Power has won two races, over the mile, this preparation for Sheahan and has placed on another three occasions.

All of those results came on rain-affected tracks.

Sheahan said the other key to Golan Power is finding the front.

“If he leads, he fights until the end,” he said.

“He’s always slow away, but if he can find his way to the front then he toughs it out to the finish.

“He doesn’t muck the start up, he’s just slow to get going. If he can get his way to the front, he’ll fight. When he sees another horse coming, it’s the only time he really digs in.”

At his past two starts at Canberra, he has failed to find the front and has struggled to beat many home.

Aside from leading and wet tracks, Sheahan said the third crucial factor for Golan Power was light weights.

Canberra apprentice Rachel Hunt will take the ride on Golan Power on Saturday and her two kilogram claim will see the Gundagai galloper carry just 52kg.

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