Heavy rain in August and September lashes the Riverina

Henty Machinery Field Days chairman Ross Edwards says the site was prepared for the wet conditions. Picture: Nikki Reynolds

Henty Machinery Field Days chairman Ross Edwards says the site was prepared for the wet conditions. Picture: Nikki Reynolds

IT was gumboot weather on day two of the Henty Machinery Field Days (HMFD).

The event opened with fine weather on the first day and then the site received 16 millimetres of rain overnight on Tuesday.

HMFD chairman Ross Edwards said the site had been prepared for the expected rain.

He said exhibitors were busy spreading bark to sure up paths and walkways. The 122-metre long Taylor Wood pavillion was also opened in perfect time to allow patrons and exhibitors to shield from the rain. According to the NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) the wet weather is set to continue into spring.

According to the latest seasonal conditions report parts of the Riverina have received more than 100mm during August backed up by record falls in September. 

DPI seasonal conditions coordinator Ian McGowen said during August most of NSW received above average rainfall.

He said some areas in central and southern NSW were experiencing waterlogging. “The early sown winter crops continue to show the best potential, with yields in better drained areas or on lighter soils likely to be average to above average,” he said.

“In some areas of the Central West and Riverina crop losses from 10 to 30 per cent ... have occurred.”

DPI water, manager surface water, Brian Graham said rain bands continue to track regularly across NSW producing strong runoff, storage improvements and increased water allocations. Meanwhile, farmers requiring assistance or wishing to report damage as a result of severe flooding and heavy rain are being encouraged to contact their Local Land Services Office on 1300 795 299.

DPI state emergency management officer, David Gorman said the NSW Government is providing emergency assistance to farmers following significant rainfall and flooding over the past month. “So far we have assisted more than 1500 sheep and cattle by moving them to higher ground,” he said.  “DPI will continue to assess the impact to livestock, crops and farm infrastructure.”

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