Local driving instructor expresses outrage over cyclists disregarding road rules, following 'troubling' incident.

Driving instructor Glen Gaudron says he witnessed cyclists breaking road rules.

Driving instructor Glen Gaudron says he witnessed cyclists breaking road rules.

A local driving instructor has expressed outrage over cyclists who disregard road rules, after a particularly “dangerous and troubling” incident.

Owner of Wagga’s Able Driving School Glen Gaudron said he was teaching a first-time driver on Gregadoo Road when he had “the worst encounter” he has encountered with cyclists breaking the road rules and abusing a motorist.

Mr Gaudron’s driver was travelling behind a small group of riders at a safe distance when they were suddenly overtaken on both sides of the car by a large group of cyclists across double unbroken lines.

The instructor said the cyclists followed this “huge violation” of road laws by hurling insults and abuse at the car.

"When they went past us there were fingers in the air and they were hurling abuse at us for simply doing the right thing,” Mr Gaudron said.

“I don't experience that kind of disregard for rules and abuse often, but this was another level.

"A leaner driver is unpredictable, so the cyclists put themselves in real danger and, quite simply, they could have been killed.”

The incident comes as higher penalties for cyclists were rolled out across the state yesterday.

The new laws will see changes including the fine for cyclists who run red lights increasing five-fold to $425 and cyclists required to carry identification on them while riding.

“When asked to comment about Mr Gaudron’s experience with the cyclists, Wagga Cycling Club president James Vickers said: “we encourage all cyclist to obey the road rules at all times.”

The incident occurred during a sanctioned event, the Tour De Riverina.

Mr Gaudron said he was in support of the tougher penalties to be enforced on cyclists, particularly the that of holding identification.

"I think it's a great idea for cyclists to carry ID with them,” he said.

“If they're doing the wrong thing, police can identify them right then and there, so they'll be getting pulled up quickly and then they might think twice about breaking the rules again."

On the matter of the new penalties, Mr Vickers declined to comment.

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