Wagga shoppers divided on plastic bag ban | Poll

SHOPPING TRIP: Kylie Waddell and her helper, Riley, 5 outside Aldi believes any ban on plastic bags has to be for all bags. Picture: Declan Rurenga

SHOPPING TRIP: Kylie Waddell and her helper, Riley, 5 outside Aldi believes any ban on plastic bags has to be for all bags. Picture: Declan Rurenga

WAGGA shoppers are divided on a potential plastic bag ban for NSW while the city’s business chamber is “dead-set against” the legislation.

The Greens have handed the potential legislation to the state parliament.

“I don’t agree with a total ban, because sometimes you get caught without a bag,” resident John Bragg said.

Mr Bragg said a charge would be a sensible way to discourage use and encourage people to buy re-usable bags.

“I keep a few re-usables in the car,” he said.

Wagga’s Kylie Waddell said a ban would just mean people use different kinds of plastic bags.

“If you’re going to ban plastic bags from shops, why not go the full mile and do it for all plastic bags?” she asked.

“It’s more about getting people to do the right thing.”

For Coolamon’s Tracey Hard the carrying re-usable bags became a serious time constraint.

“Doing the family’s weekly shop and carrying my own bags into the shop is not particularly realistic,” she said.

“Repacking everything into my own bags means a weekly shop can take 90 minutes.”

Mrs Hard said everything had a second use.

“I always use these (plastic bags) at home, no matter what.”

Wagga Business Chamber president Tim Rose said the group opposed anything which makes shopping harder.

“It’s convenient for shoppers, if you’re not bringing your own bag, you’re less likely to shop,” Mr Rose said.

“We’re dead-set against any regulation which makes life harder for the shopper.

“Most plastic bags are now recyclable because they have corn-starch in them.”

Mr Rose said banning of plastic bags could potentially drive shoppers to online stores instead of local shops, while alternatives like paper bags came with their own set of costs and problems.

“Whichever way you look at it, they’re here to stay,” he said.

“If you’re environmentally friendly, you’ll bring your own bags.

“I’d rather see it remain voluntary.”

Mr Rose said a ban on bags had not been fully thought through by the NSW Greens.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop